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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
, such as taxes and insurance, generally cannot add up to more than 43% of their monthly gross income. no standard is perfect, but the standard here provides a clear line with a measure of protection to borrowers that have increased certainty in the mortgage market. host: i want to bring in a few callers on this subject for you. oklahoma city, oklahoma, democratic line. good morning, vernon. caller: i am tickled to death that the government is setting the rules for the financial industry when it comes to the home market. people worked all their lives to provide a home and held for ways to get it paid off before they retire. this is the one area that the government needs to regulate and regulate closely and i am glad we're finally doing that. now, of course, we have drawn a line in the sand that we can hopefully reclaim. can we hope that it will ever change back to what we thought we had been through? guest: an excellent question. another one to add to that is -- will the regulators have the appetite to regulate this closely? making sure that banks are abiding by these rules? we had a system going
burden on the bar were. monthly deaths of the consumer, such as taxes and insurance, generally cannot add up to more than 43% of their monthly gross income. no standard is perfect, but the standard here provides a clear line with a measure of protection to borrowers that have increased certainty in the mortgage market. host: i want to bring in a few callers on this subject for you. oklahoma city, oklahoma, democratic line. good morning, vernon. caller: i am tickled to death that the government is setting the rules for the financial industry when it comes to the home market. people worked all their lives to provide a home and held for ways to get it paid off before they retire. this is the one area that the government needs to regulate and regulate closely and i am glad we're finally doing that. now, of course, we have drawn a line in the sand that we can hopefully reclaim. can we hope that it will ever change back to what we thought we had been through? guest: an excellent question. another one to add to that is -- will the regulators have the appetite to regulate this closely? making sur
, hidden taxes will take a painful bite. inside is the story from that conley who friends the argument more so in the washington d.c. area. local residents will be paying uncle sam more in 2013, between the two percent increase in payroll tax and to lesser known provisions buried in the fiscal cliff deal. there is also the issue of the health care tax, which also may hit some individuals. more details from the washington sunday examiner. the question we are focusing on is whether the president will bypass congress to raise the debt ceiling. we are getting your calls in common. buddy on the republican line. caller: good morning. it would not surprise me that he does raise the debt ceiling. the president alone spent over $1 billion last year just to himself. when does it stop? obviously he has never had a checkbook. i get a bill, i pay it. why do they just keep putting money out, putting money out, not take care of what they're doing doing, not realizing what they're doing? host: they give for the call. this from twitter -- the focus on the 14th amendment, section four, basically says that th
for the ball and all of this stuff. right after he raised the taxes, i am just barely living. i made $20,000 per year and now that my paycheck is getting cut because he raised taxes, i cannot even afford food. i have two grandchildren and cannot afford to feed them. from 50,000 on down, 60,000 on down, why not tax us? he just tax the people that are higher? host: thank you for the call. let me use this point -- we are not focusing as much on budgets and taxes, but these are tougher economic times and this is something these committees have taken into account? guest: that was the driver behind scaling down from 10 balls to two. george bush in his second inauguration also had 10. that is where the standard was. that has been cut way back. there will be a concert on the national mall with bruce springsteen. there have been efforts not to overspend and there is a willingness to acknowledge that so many americans are having a tough economic times. host: tony, who morning. thank you for calling in. caller: thank you. i want to know, white people started all the money stuff. this president, why
at the tax and regulato regulatory, if it's cheaper to make it in china and ship it here. that's not the company's fault, that's the government's fault. you see toyota expanding in mississippi and i think volkswagen in tennessee and what do those states have in common, oh, yes, right to work. so the problem isn't so much -- it's partly the tax aof the government and the punitive costs of unions in states like michigan which has now gone right to work and see how that affects the auto industry. at the end of the day, 26.5 of the auto bailout was a direct check written to the united auto workers and the democrats 2012 in the election cycle. >> and joining us live to tell us how mitt romney is right, ironically he we find that out on the day the president is sworn in for a second term. seton, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> they've committed horrific crimes and now are asking for forgiveness and someone to love them. that story is straight ahead, match.com. and they were hand picked to sing at president obama's inauguration, we're seeing how the big choir is preparing for th
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)